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is from a farm in north carolina and will be displayed in the blue room. dan and bianna, they have a head start on me. i'm notorious for putting up a tree on december 23rd. >> better than december 26th. >> it stays up until like march. that's the problem. >> nice to see bo in that shot, too. did you see bo, the dog? >> just like the girls, he's huge. >> he's grown. yes. alex, thank you. >>> well, the smoke is now clearing from the black friday fireworks which started earlier than ever, on thanksgiving night. millions of americans hit the malls in a mad dash to get their hands on hot holiday deals at rock-bottom prices. and abc's john schriffen found himself in the middle of the mayhem and joins us from a kmart in new york city. good morning, john. i saw you tweeted, what a difference a day makes. >> reporter: it is so different here. bianna, good morning. i feel like i can come out of hiding right now because things have certainly calmed down. at least here at this kmart. now, the past two days, everything you can imagine has been flying off the shelves, with early indications that this c
morning, dan. with sales starting so early, retailers say they got an early heads-up on the shopping this christmas season. it was pretty hard to ignore the deals. and the new gadgets. like your own drone. apple, playing hard to get, wouldn't announce their deals until friday morning. flashing ipads, ipods and accessory prices to compete with stores, like target. offering as much as $60 gift cards with a purchase of certain ipads. and some deals were announced via twitter. what were the big sellers in this year's black friday sales. >> pretty similar to last year. electronics, video games, tvs, toys. >> reporter: bradsdeals.com said the most popular deal was a vizio 60-inch hd-tv, for $688 at walmart. target staffers tell us board games, furby. yes, furby is back. along with traditional favorites, barbie. also hard to keep stock, some believe this year's hot ticket item, wii u, watch tv and play games all at the same time. >> they check out the deals and find out something else is wonderful that they need to have. or makes a great gift for someone else. >> reporter: like brookstone's
the couples are not getting the full story. >> dan noiz has the story of one couple whose adopted children came from a mental institution. >> this has been probable lit hardest thing i, i can't imagine going through anything any worse. >> laurie ask jason thought they were doing the right thing. the north carolina couple decided to adopt two children from an u orphanage but say they were misled by people supposed to make sure adoptions went smoothly. >> it's destroyed our family. it has destroyed our family literally. >> in april, 2010 the couple group. >> i cry cried throughout the presentation. >> they were hooked. the group introduced them to advocate for orphans. avila charged them $4875 for services. >> he's supposed to make sure that we have all of the information that we need. >> he agreed to adopt a 9-year-old before meeting her. after jason went on a mission trip, and saw the living conditions at the orphanage, the family decided to adopt a 14-year-old. >> you want to get them out of there. it is a horrible physical environment. >> they say avila never raised questions about the c
? why then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- you're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking enough on the spending side. there seems to be movement toward the idea that some people's taxes will go up at the high end. middle class won't see much of a tax increase. why the optimism? are we justified? >> well, i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and our other guests here. the typical median income is $60,000 a year for a family. they're not getting a lot of money from capital gains and dividends. they're not freaked out at the prospect of those going up. they're concerned about what is in their paycheck. paychecks are morsteady than they had been any time the last few years. wages are going up a little bit. the biggest asset that anybody owns is a house. we finally seem -- it's not just the value of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with every passing week, you know, certain number of people underwater on their mortgages are now in
is dan henning. >> good morning. >> john: it was a pretty slow news week. >> yeah nothing to talk about. >> john: the violence in the middle east, the action of various governors to undermine the affordable health care act, the um coming thanksgiving and black friday, and elmo leaving sesame street, which is a pretty painful thing for all if you have a kid. >> uh-huh. >> john: but i'm really thrilled to be here on the eve of thanksgiving, i'm thankful for shows like this. we're going to talk about black friday and the real history of thanks give as well. and really a tough question i want to ask everyone listening progressive and conservative to call in on this we know all of the horrible things of black friday, that it takes the christmas message of jesus and his anti-materialism message and completely, well makes a joke out of it. thanks giving is a time when christians buy lots of material possessions to celebration though guy who denounced material processions. we all know how about how these prices are jacked up and then put on sale, we know all of the bad
. dan simon tells us why sma smartphones and social media aren't just for kids. >> reporter: barbara is constantly using her phone. >> i keep it at my bedside. >> reporter: she represents a growing segment of smartphone add adapters. baby boomers but not explosive growth that you see with younger users. fewer than four in ten boomers have smartphones. that's only expected to inch up in the next few years. when it comes to social networks, silicone valley may need a different strategy. while barbara logs onto facebook and twitter, she does not post photos or reveal much information. >> i don't share a ton of stuff about my personal life because it doesn't occur to me to do that. >> reporter: it's not that boomers are shunning social networks, it's yet they have fully to embrace it. experts like esra palmer. >> sharing photos or check ng at restaurants, they're not going to be that excited about doing that. >> reporter: emarketer did a study on boomers. it found that 57% of them had viewed social networks. not bad. those that do are unlikely to use regularly. also privacy is a much big
could be the decisive factor in winning over business. dan simon, cnn, san francisco. with the adt after thanksgiving sale. get adt home security and home management starting at just $99. that's a savings of $300. plus 15% off accessories. call now or visit adtpulse.com/tv. sale ends midnight november 27th. more than a security system, adt can help you turn on a few lights. bring family in from the cold. even let you know when an old friend has arrived. get the advanced technology of adt and save $300. starting at $99 installed. pulse save on accessories. call now or visit adtpulse.com/tv. sale ends midnight november 27th. humans -- sometimes life trips us up. and sometimes, we trip ourselves up, but that's okay. at liberty mutual insurance we can "untrip" you as you go through your life with personalized policies and discounts when you need them most. just call... and speak with a licensed representative about saving on your policy when you get married, move into a new house... [crash!] or add a car to your policy. don't forget to ask about saving up to 10% when you combine your auto an
and for all. >> eric: dan sash hard line than me. >> brian: pull the stats out of the books, too? >> bob: put asterisk next to them. >> brian: make it twice as big. >> --are on steroids. [ overtalk ] >> bob: he has taken over the whole show. >> kimberly: he has. >> bob: common. >> dana: i pound out about something last night. if you want to help the hurricane sandy victims this is a great way to do it. broadway is getting together doing broadway blows back. benefit that will help the victims, tunnel of tower foundation, brought to me by betsy. and all the stars getting together december 10 at 7:30 p.m. you can buy a ticket and go and see a lot of your favorites perform that night. which i think is a really great way. >> brian: metro area, fantastic. >> bob: thanks, brian. >> brian: i can't comment now? >> eric: clip. a lot of companies are doing something interesting. moving their dividends up to be declared and pay it before the end of the year so that investors don't get nailed by the fiscal cliff. take a look at the screen. wal-mart, las vegas sands, movato, costco, big ones. disney annou
a few words about our california former attorney general, congressman dan lungren. congressman lungren was first elected to congress in 1978, where his legal background was instrumental in his leadership on judiciary, criminal juiceties and immigration issues. he was called back to state service in 1989 and successfully ran for attorney general where he served from 1991 to 1999. as attorney general, congressman lungren helped author and later defended in court california's landmark three strikes and you're out law. during his tenure and due to his tough on crime policies. crime plunged 30% to historic lows in california. after a few years in the private sector -- sector and the aftermath of september 11, 2001, congressman lungren decided to return to congress and was re-elected in 2004. since his return, congressman lungren has used his time and talents as a member of the judiciary and homeland security committee. throughout his career, congressman lungren has supported, and been supported by his wonderful wife bobbie and their family. thank you, congressman lunfwren for your contribut
want to thank you the program organizers for bring this together. dan has written a wonderful book and i think that you'll be impressed with what he's put together in the celebration of prohibition and the antiprohibition movement. it's an exciting time to talk about prevention for the reason that the election has been questioned the antiprovision before us all over again. in addition to develop initiative in colorado and washington, we also have in massachusetts and the new announcements and our island and maine the legislators and those of us in the jurisdiction to get the question of decriminalization of marijuana for recreational use. so, the question of the day i think is what lessons can we draw from provision for today's? >> the first 1i think we all know prohibition was a terrible failure. despite the best we have to remind ourselves the good reasons. it was a very drunken country. the efforts didn't succeed. every society were no one could see that because if there is part of the world that wants something and another part wants to try at it will be provided and that is th
, but it is actually the demand side that is broken, not the supply side. dan mintz any move the government makes to take money out of the pockets -- that means that any move the government makes to take money out of the pockets of the middle income people will hurt the economy. one third of the economy and economic problems are caused by lack of unemployment. so, if more money were spent on a jobs program, especially building roads, things that increase productivity, we would be much better off than giving tax breaks to the rich. so, i think the argument is skewed because we have a supply- demand economy, and it is the demand but is broken here. host: zachary goldfarb. guest: the most immediate problem is a continued lack of demand and economic activity which is leftover from the financial crisis and the recession, and there is a debate in washington over whether you should address that now through additional spending measures. there are not many proposals to do that, but people like larry summers have suggested reviewing the payroll tax cut. in the context in the debate over the bush tax cuts,
and dan rather stepping in. i think there was competition and jealousy, and the. i think on walter's part there was some regret. he he was such an icon even in his own day. what made me excited was that, through all of that, the culture of storytelling and reporting did not change at all. in some ways, it gradually did start to change at cbs. but, for me, i could not believe it. i felt like these people were so professional. i was scared to death. that is a good thing, i think, that you feel like you have a lot of experience and you have done a lot of reporting and producing and you understand television news, but you are surrounded people who are really good and challenge you. i love that. i felt like i was able to learn some of the more traditional values you will at the school that started in our building. i will talk about those a little bit as we go. hi also got very fortunate because i ended up overseas within about three years. .ased in london i recommend it highly for students. think about an international assignment. there are very few things as challenging. people do not know, c
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12